Trinity-Life In The Basement

Sure, it’s easy to look back on life and dream of where you could have made it better. Hindsight being 20/20 the road not traveled becomes perfectly clear.

If the Mets were a person and not an organization, I imagine some mother and father being there to at least point out what they were doing wrong. Life is, after all more than donning the orange and blue you inherited from two teams that moved as far away as possible.

Kids.

 Am I right?

From the beginning what the Mets lacked in direction they more than made up for in entertainment value. A toddler learning to take it’s first steps and smiling a toothless grin while they fell face first into every obstacle in their path.

As fans stood proud and watched their miracle team of 1969 win the World Series a huge opportunity had been missed.

Sure, graduating high school was great but I really wish you would have taken that advanced Algebra class. It really could have helped.

In 1966 the Mets drafted Steve Chilcott with the number one pick.

Hear me out.

Maybe this is someone you take to prom but don’t marry this one.

Chilcott never played a game in the major leagues and Reggie Jackson (taken with the number two pick) went on to 5 World Series championships and a Hall Of Fame career.

The Mets fell to around .500 the year after the World Series. Would Reggie have been enough to push them over the 6 game deficit? Maybe. Maybe not. Couldn’t have hurt.

Surely, Amos Otis would have helped.

Could anyone have known that the 23 year old would suddenly steal 33 bases the year after being traded to the Royals?

No.

I am certain someone could have seen Joe Foy coming.

Perhaps the best Foy story is him possibly being high on marijuana at third base one day and having a line drive hit by him. After the ball went by, Foy continued pounding his glove and yelling “Hit it to me” much to the dismay of pitcher Jerry Koosman.

So, maybe Jackson and Otis make up some of the games in 1970 and 1971 but the Mets still fall just short.

1972 was the biggest blunder of all.

While the team was still pitching rich and wanting a third basemen so bad they traded Nolan Ryan for Jim Fregosi.

Maybe they are not looking for offense if they had drafted Reggie or kept Amos.

I know. I know.

Hindsight.

Nolan Ryan exploded on the scene his first year away from the Mets and won 19 games.

If you are keeping score, that is a rotation of Tom Seaver, Jerry Koosman, Jon Matlack and Nolan Ryan.

Oh yeah, with an offense of adding Amos Otis and Reggie Jackson to an actual good choice of Rusty Staub.

 One ridiculously bad decision is enough but three?

No one can expect to be right all the time.

If you were right all the time you could most likely hang World Series banners throughout the early 70’s.

 Perhaps go to college and invest in some free agents to keep this going.

Or you could live in your parent’s basement the rest of your life.

Your decision…

By: Vincent Weeks

nolan ryan (49)

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